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Old 23 Apr 2012, 09:10 AM   #357657 / #1
David B
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Default Fireball over America

http://news.yahoo.com/explosion-fire...192029411.html

It is becoming more apparent that airburst and impact events are much more common than was thought a few decades ago.

This one just big enough to cause a spectacular light show, though the meteor hunters will be out looking for fragments that made it to earth. Hope they find some.

If my decades old chemistry studies are properly remembered, wouldn't the reports that there was green in the fireball indicate copper?

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Old 23 Apr 2012, 02:56 PM   #357772 / #2
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Are the UFO or other conspiracy nuts foaming at the mouth yet?
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Old 23 Apr 2012, 03:03 PM   #357777 / #3
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I saw one reference in a comment to Aliens, but I thought it tongue in cheek.

Without looking back to check, there were a couple of people in some comments who seemed to think the perceived rise in sightings of such events are signs of end times.

I think I'll google it again, to see if there is anything new, mainly about whether there have been any reports of fragments being found, but also to see if there have been many oddball comments.

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Old 23 Apr 2012, 04:36 PM   #357840 / #4
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Are the UFO or other conspiracy nuts foaming at the mouth yet?
I've heard some skepticism about the official story from those who actually heard/felt the explosion. Nevadans are accustomed to the military treating their patch of desert as a national dumping ground, so I don't know if accusing them of covering something up really counts as a conspiracy or not.
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Old 23 Apr 2012, 05:04 PM   #357862 / #5
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When I lived in the country (50 acres in Coryell County, Texas, about 80 miles from the nearest city of any size), we had some city-people guests over in the evening. As we were walking out to the barns to feed the horses, they remarked on how dark it was -- I said, "Yeah, out here you can really see the stars." We all looked up, of course, and at that moment, as if on cue, a fireball streaked across the sky and exploded in a burst of colors. After a moment, one of our guests asked, "Does that happen all the time?"
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Old 23 Apr 2012, 08:34 PM   #357970 / #6
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Tell me you deadpanned "Of course! Don't they happen in your neck of the woods?"
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Old 23 Apr 2012, 10:21 PM   #358019 / #7
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Or "Wayll, that's iffen they don't hit one o' th' dogies first."
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Old 23 Apr 2012, 11:01 PM   #358044 / #8
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Tell me you deadpanned "Of course! Don't they happen in your neck of the woods?"
I am congenitally truthful, I'm afraid. I said, "I've never seen that before in my life."

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Or "Wayll, that's iffen they don't hit one o' th' dogies first."
Well, it would have been colts, not calves, but the true West Texan way of saying that would be "Nope." Think Gary Cooper, not Jed Clampett.

The proper Texas pronunciation of "well" is "wal." Rhymes with "all" -- you know, that black stuff that comes out of the ground here, that we make gas (or petrol) from. Same vowel sound as "tar." You know, those big rubber doughnut things at the corners of your car.
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Old 23 Apr 2012, 11:15 PM   #358061 / #9
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Well, it would have been colts, not calves, but the true West Texan way of saying that would be "Nope." Think Gary Cooper, not Jed Clampett.
They don't know that, they're city folk.
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Old 24 Apr 2012, 12:23 AM   #358113 / #10
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Well, it would have been colts, not calves, but the true West Texan way of saying that would be "Nope." Think Gary Cooper, not Jed Clampett.
They don't know that, they're city folk.
Ah, but they were TEXAS city folk. The "city" reference was only in that they had probably never seen a truly dark sky. The Milky Way isn't just a poetic metaphor -- it's an actual thing you can see in the sky, but people who live in large cities may not know that.

If you're one of those city people, here's a demonstration: Put your thumbs and forefingers together to make a triangle shape and hold it at arm's length; in the city, it will probably contain a single star (more probably a planet). In the country, it will contain perhaps a hundred points of light, or more. The difference is huge, and is the one thing, besides the silence, that I miss most about living in the boondocks. When you see a truly dark sky, especially when there is no Moon, you can understand why the sky was filled with animals and heroes and strange portents to the ancients, and why they named those strangely wandering planets after their gods. Their world was lit with fire only, and all skies were dark.
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Old 24 Apr 2012, 04:18 AM   #358183 / #11
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One of my most precious memories is of a night when I was a teenager, riding through the mountains in the car with my folks - I have no idea now why or even where, but it was very, very late, and there was no moon. Then Dad stopped the car in a turnout and we got out and looked up.

Oh. My. God. There were literally thousands of stars visible. The Milky Way was clear as day. Every square inch of sky (looked at through your fingers, like you say) was just peppered with them, with a hundred or more.

I've never seen the night sky like that since; always had too much light pollution, even in the "country". But near the top of my bucket list is to find a way to see it again.
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Old 24 Apr 2012, 06:11 AM   #358202 / #12
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I miss that terribly about the open desert, sometimes.

The stars, like dust, encircle me
In living mists of light
And all of space I seem to see
In one vast burst of sight
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Old 24 Apr 2012, 05:17 PM   #358349 / #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefoot Bree View Post
One of my most precious memories is of a night when I was a teenager, riding through the mountains in the car with my folks - I have no idea now why or even where, but it was very, very late, and there was no moon. Then Dad stopped the car in a turnout and we got out and looked up.

Oh. My. God. There were literally thousands of stars visible. The Milky Way was clear as day. Every square inch of sky (looked at through your fingers, like you say) was just peppered with them, with a hundred or more.

I've never seen the night sky like that since; always had too much light pollution, even in the "country". But near the top of my bucket list is to find a way to see it again.
Just wait until you see the Northern Lights.:
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Old 24 Apr 2012, 10:03 PM   #358463 / #14
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Have done, silly. A year and a half - two winters - in Alaska, outside Fairbanks.

Saw a fair few starry nights there, too, but never quite as spectacular as that one night described above. Probably because I never got far off the base (USAF) the light pollution from the flight line and buildings.
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Old 25 Apr 2012, 01:18 AM   #358558 / #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefoot Bree View Post
One of my most precious memories is of a night when I was a teenager, riding through the mountains in the car with my folks - I have no idea now why or even where, but it was very, very late, and there was no moon. Then Dad stopped the car in a turnout and we got out and looked up.

Oh. My. God. There were literally thousands of stars visible. The Milky Way was clear as day. Every square inch of sky (looked at through your fingers, like you say) was just peppered with them, with a hundred or more.

I've never seen the night sky like that since; always had too much light pollution, even in the "country". But near the top of my bucket list is to find a way to see it again.
I love looking at the stars in rural Iowa and Nebraska (though West Texas is about the best viewing I've seen, other than Alaska).

At any given moment, surprisingly, the most number of stars you can see with the naked eye is about 2,000. Seems like more, doesn't it!

http://www.universetoday.com/24310/h...s-can-you-see/
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Old 28 Apr 2012, 01:46 PM   #359595 / #16
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If my decades old chemistry studies are properly remembered, wouldn't the reports that there was green in the fireball indicate copper?

David
Other metals have prominent green lines, too: barium and thallium. Most likely, however, considering abundance, is a line of atomic oxygen.
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Old 29 Apr 2012, 12:01 PM   #359794 / #17
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Like what makes many auroras green: Why are there Colors in the Aurora?
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Old 29 Apr 2012, 01:26 PM   #359825 / #18
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Thanks guys - something else learnt

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