Friends of the Secular Café: Forums
Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain
Talk Freethought
Rational Skepticism Forum
EvC Forum: Evolution vs. Creation
Living Nonreligion Discussion Forum
The Round Table (RatPags)
Talk Rational!
Blogs
Blue Collar Atheist
Camels With Hammers
Ebonmuse: Daylight Atheism
Nontheist Nexus
The Re-Enlightenment
Rosa Rubicondior
The Skeptical Zone
Watching the Deniers
Others
Christianity Disproved
Count Me Out
Ebon Musings
Freethinker.co.uk
 
       

Go Back   Secular Café > Intellectual Debate and Discussion Forums > Miscellaneous Discussions

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04 Feb 2010, 01:13 PM   #105135 / #1
lpetrich
Smart Designer
SysAdmin; Mod: LU&E, C&AS
 
lpetrich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Lebanon, OR, USA
Posts: 13,858
Default Darwin Day Celebration: Phylum Feast

From Friendly Atheist by @hemantsblog » Phylum Feast for Darwin Day is an interesting way to celebrate Darwin Day: to eat a meal that covers much of the family tree of the Earth's biota.

Hugh Kramer in A weird way to celebrate Charles Darwin's birthday mentioned this menu:
  • Mammalia: Minke Whale meat
  • Aves: Smoked Turkey slices
  • Teleostoma: Pickled Herring
  • Bivalvia: Mya (clams) from mouth of the Honna River
  • Gastropoda: commercial escargot
  • Malacostraca: commercial shrimp
  • Pteridophyta: commercial fern fiddleheads
  • Monocots: Onions, rice
  • Dicots: Pecans, spinach
  • Fungi: commercial Agaricus (mushrooms)
  • Bacteria: villi (Finnish Longmilk (yogurt))

Here are some phylogeny (family tree of life) sites:

University of California Museum of Paleontology: History of life through time
Tree of Life Web Project (more technical)

I'll summarize where the more common food organisms are, and some less common ones. I'll try to avoid Chinese cuisine

Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates): (pig, ruminants: ((bovine, buffalo), (sheep, goat), deer))
Mammalia: Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla (odd-toed ungulates): horse (horsemeat, anyone?)
Phasianidae: chicken, turkey, quail, pheasant
Anatidae: duck, goose
Galloanserae: Galliformes: Phasianidae, Anseriformes: Anatidae
Aves: Galloanserae, Struthioformes: ostrich

Diapsida: Archosauria (Crocodilia, Aves), Squamata (iguana, rattlesnake)
Amniota (with amniotic eggs): Mammalia, Diapsida, Testudines (turtles)
Tetrapoda (four-limbed vertebrates): Amniota, Salientia: frog
Osteichthyes (bony fish): Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish, Tetrapoda), Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish - nearly all the fish that we eat)
Gnathostomata (jawed fish): Chondrichthyes (cartilage fish): (sharks, rays), Osteichthyes
Deuterostomia: Chordata: (Gnathostomata), Echinodermata: sea urchins

Arthropoda: Crustacea: shrimp, lobster, crab
Gastropoda: escargot (snail)
Bivalvia: clams, mussels, oysters, scallops
Cephalopoda: squid, octopus
Mollusca: (Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Cephalopoda)
Protostomia: (Arthropoda, Mollusca)

Metazoa (animal kingdom): Bilateria: (Protostomia, Deuterostomia)

So to get a good spread, you can eat shrimp, clams, fish, chicken, and pork - they are related as

((shrimp, clams), (fish, (chicken, pig)))


Going outside the animal kingdom, we find

Ascomycota: yeast, Penicillium mold (in bleu cheese)
Basidiomycota: mushrooms
Fungi: Ascomycota, Basidiomycota
Opisthokonta (flagellum at rear): Metazoa, Fungi


Now to plants.

Eudicots: most broadleaf food plants: carrot, radish, beet, broccoli, lettuce, cabbage, tomato, potato, chili pepper, beans, pea, walnut, pecan, hazelnut, peanut, sunflower, apple, pear, orange, lemon, strawberry, raspberry, blueberry, grape, ...

Arecaceae (palm trees): date palm, coconut palm
Poaceae (grasses): wheat, barley, rye, oats, American corn, sugar cane
Monocots: most narrowleaf food plants: Arecaceae, Poaceae, pineapple, banana, asparagus
Magnoliids: cinnamon, black pepper
Angiospermae (flowering plants): eudicots, monocots, magnoliids

Pinophyta (conifers): pine trees (some of them make pine nuts)
Spermatophyta (seed plants): Angiospermae, Pinophyta
Embryophyta (land plants): Spermatophyta
Viridiplantae (green algae): Embryophyta, Ulva (sea lettuce)
Rhodophyta (red algae): nori, etc.
Archaeplastida: Viridiplantae, Rhodophyta

Thus making

((((broadleaf, narrowleaf), pine nuts), sea lettuce), nori)


Not much I can find elsewhere in eukaryotedom:

Chromalveolata: Phaeophyceae (brown algae): Laminariales (kelp: some kinds are edible)

Summing up the domain of nucleated-cell organisms:

Eukarya: Opisthokonta, Archaeplastida, Chromalveolata

So you can include beer, mushrooms, pine nuts, and kelp.


Looking outside Eukarya among the two prokaryote domains, Bacteria and Archaea, we find:

Firmicutes: Lactobacillus and Streptococcus, used to make yogurt
Cyanobacteria: Spirulina
Bacteria: Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria

So you can top it off with yogurt and Spirulina tablets.


I wasn't sure where to put this; it straddles MD, GH, and LU&E.
lpetrich is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 11 Feb 2010, 10:17 PM   #107777 / #2
lpetrich
Smart Designer
SysAdmin; Mod: LU&E, C&AS
 
lpetrich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Lebanon, OR, USA
Posts: 13,858
Default

As I write this, Darwin Day is tomorrow. Someone claimed that more suitable subjects of a phylum feast would be organisms associated with Charles Darwin and his work, like the notable fauna of the Galapagos Islands. But many of those species are protected, so one has to use various approximations.

On those islands:
  • Those finches - squab (pigeon) - not really close, but ecologically similar
  • Blue-footed boobies - duck - not really close, but ecologically similar
  • Giant tortoises - mainland turtle species
  • Marine iguanas - mainland iguana species
Yes, I've found some companies that sell turtle meat and iguana meat.

About pigeons, Charles Darwin discussed pigeon breeding and pigeon breeds in gory detail in his Origin of Species as artificial selection in action.

He also spent 8 years working on a monumental tome about barnacles, crustaceans that don't look and act like typical crustaceans in their adult phase. However,

Late in his life, he studied earthworms. Their most commonly eaten relatives are palolo worms, marine polychaete worms that live near Samoa.

He also studied various plant species, like orchids and various carnivorous plants.

The closest food plants to orchids are fellow members of Asparagales like asapargus.

The closest food plants to the Venus flytrap, sundew, and Nepenthes pitcher plants are fellow members of Caryophyllales: beets, rhubarb, buckwheat, chard, and amaranth.

The closest food plants to Sarracenia pitcher plants are fellow members of Ericales: tea trees, Brazil-nut trees, and kiwi-fruit, persimmon, blueberry, huckleberry, and cranberry plants.

Related as

(((((duck, pigeon), iguana), turtle), (crustaceans, palolo worm)), ((Caryophyllales, Ericales), Asparagales))

So we can eat duck, iguana, shrimp, asparagus, beets, and blueberries in his honor.
lpetrich is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 12 Feb 2010, 02:53 PM   #108050 / #3
Ray Moscow
Glory to the Hypnotoad!
 
Ray Moscow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Surrey, England
Posts: 8,903
Default

Hmmm ... today I'll have chicken, wheat (bread and pasta), oats (breakfast porridge), coffee & tea with a bit of cow milk, and various vegetables and fruits.

Sorry, Charlie. I'm not sure you'd want me to eat my way through the tree of life in your honour.
Ray Moscow is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 12 Feb 2010, 03:02 PM   #108053 / #4
Anne
Senior Member
 
Anne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Between Lakes Erie and Ontario
Posts: 5,141
Default

As I said elsewhere, for the last ten years, we've had a fish fry on Darwin Day...

For the last 7 I've gotten the joke.

We're having fish fry this year.
__________________
I used to be dark, angry and cynical about everything. Then I found the 'net. Whoa, there are people--- who make me look like a fucking Pollyanna--- shitting on everything out there...
... and stay off my chalk giants, you whippersnappers!
Anne is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 12 Feb 2010, 03:33 PM   #108071 / #5
lpetrich
Smart Designer
SysAdmin; Mod: LU&E, C&AS
 
lpetrich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Lebanon, OR, USA
Posts: 13,858
Default

Some walking catfish?

Yes, a present-day Darwin Fish.
lpetrich is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 12 Feb 2010, 05:26 PM   #108105 / #6
Celsus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 803
Default

I'm not a fan of sea cucumber (it's a plant! no it's an animal! no it's a darwinmonster!!) but I'll be having some of that on his behalf See it's also near enough to Chinese new year and the things we'll be eating will include:

Arthropoda, gastropoda, mollusca, mammalia, teleostoma, fungi, echinodermata, aves, er... I don't know the plant ones but legumes, er... cabbage, spinach, etc. will all be there too
Celsus is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 18 Feb 2010, 06:46 PM   #110214 / #7
Berthold
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 3,923
Default

Real vanilla is an orchid, by the way.

You left out cnidaria.
Berthold is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 18 Feb 2010, 09:00 PM   #110242 / #8
Politesse
Sapere aude
 
Politesse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Laquisimas
Posts: 19,092
Default

With all respect to Darwin, I'd rather keep the phyla alive than eat some of them to extinction.
__________________
"The truth about stories is that's all we are" ~Thomas King
Politesse is online now   Reply With Quote top bottom
Old 20 Feb 2010, 02:58 PM   #111006 / #9
Berthold
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 3,923
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Politesse View Post
With all respect to Darwin, I'd rather keep the phyla alive than eat some of them to extinction.
Eating a phylum to extinction?

Would have to be one of the small, obscure ones, such as this.

ETA: On the topic in general, William Buckland could be a good source.
From the article:
Quote:
He also seemed determined to eat every animal ever discovered, and was able to find qualities he liked in all except the common mole, which he deemed disgusting.
Berthold is offline   Reply With Quote top bottom
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   Secular Café > Intellectual Debate and Discussion Forums > Miscellaneous Discussions

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Feast of the Ass MattShizzle Religion 4 17 Jan 2012 04:30 AM
Thanksgiving-Feast Genomes lpetrich Life, the Universe, & Everything 0 28 Nov 2010 08:31 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
 
Ocean Zero by vBSkins.com | Customised by Antechinus